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Who has the "D" when the "D" is automated?

Hyperion is offering a Harvard Business Review paper called "Who has the D? How Clear Decision Roles Enhance Organizational Performance". This paper outlines a set of roles for decision-making so as to help make it clear who is supposed to do what. I took the table (without permission) and added my own column for the (slight) differences when applying these roles to EDM.

People Who Are responsible for (in manual decisions)... Are responsible for (in EDM)
Recommend
  • Making a proposal on a key decision, gathering input, and providing data and analysis to make a sensible choice in a timely fashion
  • Consulting with input providers—hearing and incorporating their views, and winning their buy-in
  • Making a proposal on rules or rule changes, gathering input and providing data and analysis to make a sensible choice of decision-making logic
  • Consulting with input providers - hearing and incorporating their views, and winning their buy in

Agree

  • Negotiating a modified proposal with the recommender if they have concerns about the original proposal
  • Escalating unresolved issues to the decider if the "A" and "R" can’t resolve differences
  • If necessary, exercising veto power over the recommendation
  • Negotiating changes to the rules with the recommender if they have concerns about the original proposal
  • Escalating unresolved issues to the decider if the "A" and "R" can't resolve differences
  • If necessary, exercising veto power over the rules or rule change

Perform

  • Executing a decision once it’s made
  • Seeing that the decision is implemented promptly and effectively
  • Handling exceptions, those decisions not handled automatically by the rules.

Input

  • Providing relevant facts to the recommender that shed light on the proposal’s feasibility and practical implications
  • Providing relevant policies, regulations, expert opinion to the recommender that shed light on the proposal's feasibility, legality and practical implications

Decide

  • Serving as the single point of accountability
  • Bringing the decision to closure by resolving any impasse in the decision-making process
  • Committing the organization to implementing the decision
  • Serving as the single point of accountability
  • Bring the decision logic to closure by resolving any impasse in the decision-making process
  • Committing the organization to executing the rules or rule changes

As you can see, lots of similarities and just a few differences. I recommend the paper - it was very interesting even if it did only cover manual decisions.

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